What Is The Best Eye Supplement: The U.S Shortlist

What Is The Best Eye Supplement: The U.S Shortlist

It seems not a week goes by when another fantastical claim is made about this or that super food or supplement. Then the next week, that claim is totally debunked. Some other food or supplement then becomes the number one healthy option.

Very recently the Advertising Standards Authority (in the UK) told a supplements’ manufacturer not to repeat its claims. They claimed that its supplements could cure Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and improve eyesight. So it is no wonder that there is now a lot of skepticism. So what is the best eye supplement?Supplements for eye health

In this post, I wanted to provide you with a shortlist of the best eye supplement for eye health available on Amazon.com using the following criteria:

»Those that include the ingredients recommended by scientific research

»Those that have the most natural ingredients.

The Scientific Results Differ But Not a Lot

Research from the Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland, found that taking a supplement containing the following (lutein (10mg), meso-zeaxanthin (10mg) and zeaxanthin (2mg)) could improve eyesight. They increased the perception of yellow and blue colors and improved night vision). These carotenoids are found in the macular. They are collectively known as macular pigment. The macular is important to our vision as it is responsible for our central vision.

Research in the US however showed a reduced risk of AMD worsening in certain groups with the condition when taking the following in a supplement: 500 mg vitamin C, 400 IU vitamin E, 10 mg lutein, 2 mg zeaxanthin, 80 mg zinc and 2 mg copper. This was the study called AREDS2. You can read more about this at Brightfocus.org.

To be clear, this study was not looking at whether supplements could prevent AMD. But whether it could prevent further deterioration of the macular for those who already had the condition.

So in both studies, the recommended amount is 10mg of lutein and 2mg of zeaxanthin. Both being carotenoids which act as as a block to harmful UV or blue light. However, they differ on the amount of the other carotenoid, meso-zeaxanthin. The Irish study recommending 10mg and the AREDS2 study not recommending any. That study advocated high doses of Vitamins C and E and some minerals instead).

So in the short list below I have tried to find supplements that contain as far as possible the recommended doses from both of these studies (in the event you favor the one over the other). I found on the Amazon.com website the doses of lutein and zeaxanthin did vary a lot between the products. This was surprising because the doses of the compounds in the products shown on the Amazon.co.uk website were, on the whole, consistent. Click here if you wish to read my post on the shortlist of those products.

So my favorites are as follows:

Vision Max Capsules

These capsules contain near enough the recommended dosage as set out in the Irish study findings. They contain 10mg of lutein, 10mg of meso-zeaxanthin and 1mg of zeaxanthin.

In addition to that, the manufacturers have added saffron (they say that clinical studies at the university of L’Aquila in Italy have shown saffron has a positive effect on eye performance). And furthermore, they contain vitamins and minerals as recommended by the AREDS2 study.

On top of that, they are 100% natural: no artificial coloring, preservatives and GMO. They are also gluten free and vegan friendly.

There are 60 capsules in a pack and 1 capsule is to be taken daily with food.

Eye Defense By Natural Stacks

This product contains a whopping 20mg of lutein and 4mg of zeaxanthin isomers (with a minimum of 1mg of meso-zeaxanthin). This capsule contains beta carotene which the AREDS2 study excluded from its formula due to its link to an increased risk to lung cancer in smokers. So one to avoid if you currently are or have been a smoker.

Each capsule contains 30 IU of Vitamin E. Again a lot lower than the recommended dose of 400 IU in the AREDS2 study.

It also contains Sea Buckthorn Oil which the manufacturer claims provides a soothing lubrication for the eyes that helps reduce dry eye syndrome, strain and fatigue.

The capsules are free of artificial color, artificial flavor and preservatives but does contain gelatin so not vegetarian or vegan friendly.

Eye Promise Restore

This product contains a decent amount of zeaxanthin at 8mg. It also contains 4mg of lutein.

It has some vitamins and minerals as recommended in the AREDS2 study but once more the doses are not at the same strength: vitamin C (120mg), vitamin E (60IU) and 15mg of zinc.

There are 60 soft gels per pack. The pack makes no mention of whether there is any gelatin or not so I am unable to report if this product is vegetarian or vegan friendly.

 


Not Every Supplement Is Equal

There are certainly a lot of supplements out there for the eyes but their contents are definitely not the same. It seems a safer bet to buy those supplements that contain the ingredients that match (or as close as possible match) those as recommended by either the Waterford study or the AREDS2 study.

The Vision Max Saffron Plus Capsules for me are my preference because they contain  the same doses of the carotenoids as recommended by the Waterford study. On top of that, the capsules contain all natural ingredients.

=> click here to purchase your first batch of capsules <=

As a closing note, please do not rely on this post as medical advice. I am not medically trained. I advise you to seek advice from your eye doctor as soon as possible if you are looking for help about an eye condition that you have.

If you have any comments about the contents of this post, please feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you.

 

 

 

Vision Max Saffron Plus

$41
9.3

Protects the Retina

9.0/10

Reduces Eye Fatigue

9.0/10

GMO and Gluten Free

10.0/10

Pros

  • A Good Formula
  • 100% natural
  • Beta-Carotene Free

Cons

  • Formula does not match Waterford studies exactly
  • Formula does not match AREDS2 study exactly
  • Further testing on the benefits of saffron to eyesight still to be done

7 thoughts on “What Is The Best Eye Supplement: The U.S Shortlist”

  1. Hi there,

    Thanks so much for sharing a good article to read that will help me to learn more about best supplements for eye health.

    I’ve seen a few offers about some products that offer to help anyone to get eye health, but I wasn’t sure if I should get them or not.

    Thanks for your article, I got good information about these products, you provide accurate information, now I have a good start point. 

  2. Hello James. Hope you are having a good time and Merry Christmas in advance. Thank you for sharing this powerful information about best supplements for eye health. I found that this article is very educative too. Knowing the contents that if found in a supplement would improve eye sight is something I’m glad to know. Nice recommendations too

  3. I have to agree with the over all view that the supplement market is an absolute minefield filled with claim after claim and disclaimers  galore. Speaking as someone who has AMD, I can tell you that the thought of losing your eyesight has to list alongside the confirmation of cancer in the devastation stakes. 

    Although I am considerably sceptical regarding finding a wonder supplement of miracle drug, and would not take anything not specifically promoted to me by a qualified optician, I find it easy to see that in a panic many would tryt anything and everything to try to save their sight. 

  4. I have to agree with the over all view that the supplement market is an absolute minefield filled with claim after claim and disclaimers  galore. Speaking as someone who has AMD, I can tell you that the thought of losing your eyesight has to list alongside the confirmation of cancer in the devastation stakes. 

    Although I am considerably sceptical regarding finding a wonder supplement of miracle drug, and would not take anything not specifically promoted to me by a qualified optician, I find it easy to see that in a panic many would tryt anything and everything to try to save their sight. 

  5. All this time I thought eating carrots would solve all eye problems. Silly me! I have a friend who has bad vision and has to wear glasses or contacts depending on his mood and he argues with me about eye health all the time. I am definitely going to refer him to this site for guidance. Very informative

  6. I just want to thank you for all the research you’ve done on the subject of what is recommended for all the research you’ve done regarding best vitamins/supplements to take for better vision.  You would think you could trust the labels of the vitamins/supplements, but clearly after your research, you can’t.  You have to know what is recommended by a reputable medical study and then you have to read the labels of the products you’re going to purchase to make sure, when it comes to your eyes, that they have lutein 10mg, mess-zeaxanthin10mg, and zeaxanthein 2mg.  You certainly don’t want to buy the product that has extra ingredients that  could cause cancer if you’re a smoker.  That was very interesting to me, I was not aware of something like that even being allowed to be in a supplement you could buy over the counter, some people aren’t inclined to research the over the counter products they purchase and this could be very dangerous.

    I’ve never purchased supplements for eye health, but after reading this article, I would probably go with your choice, The Vision Max Capsule, it had the (3) supplements recommended by the Irish study and not a lot of extra ingredients you don’t need.

    I will refer back to this article and your website for more information as needed. 

    • Thanks Cora for your response. I used to think these supplements were much the same. But having looking into the research I see that is not the case. It just shows that it pays dividends if you do some digging into these health issues yourself.

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